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Coronavirus Pandemic 2021 Senate Democrats in the Majority

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As Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi prepares to formally bring the impeachment charge against Donald Trump to the Senate for trial, some Republicans remain opposed to convicting the former president. Putting the chances of getting 17 Republican Senators to join the Democrats in an unlikely scenario.

Trump was impeached for a second time during his presidency on Jan 13. He’ll become the first President in U.S. history to faces a second trial in the Senate. This time a single charge of “incitement of insurrection” for his role in the violent riots at the U.S. Capitol on January 6th.

House Democrats will “carry the sole impeachment charge across the Capitol late Monday evening, a rare and ceremonial walk to the Senate by the prosecutors who will argue their case,” according to AP News. The 50 democrats in the Senate hope enough Republicans in the chamber, some who’ve publicly denounced Trump, will unify with them to bar the cast-off president from holding office again in the future.

Although, the GOP appears to have “turned a page” on Trump and the insurrection at the Capitol as they question if any further action would do more harm than good. Lindsay Graham (R-S.C.), who will serve as a juror in the trial has already helped the former president secure an attorney, hiring Butch Bowers, a Columbia-based federal litigator to represent Trump. An odd rallying cry to help their fallen leader, as they did during his first impeachment trial last year.

“I think the trial is stupid, I think it’s counterproductive,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL).

One Republican disagrees with Graham and Rubio, saying he believes holding another impeachment trial is constitutional.

“I believe that what is being alleged and what we saw, which is incitement to insurrection, is an impeachable offense. If not, what is?” Mitt Romney (R-UT) said on CNN Sunday.

The former presidential candidate and only Republican senator who voted to convict Trump during his first impeachment trial made it clear he plans to do so yet again.

Romney went on to say, “I think history will provide a measure of judgment with regard to those that continue to spread the lie that the (former) President began with, as well as the voters in our respective communities. I don’t think the Senate needs to take action.”

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Friday he expected the second impeachment trial of Trump to start on February 9.