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"From what I've been told, this incident does involve two students."

"We're talking about a gun every 3 to 4 days that's being found on a CMS campus."

"I think both schools want this to go away immediately..."

"It appears to be solely a CMS thing."

"Nine guns, three knives and two potential sexual assaults since August 25th."

"This is something you obviously need to talk to your kids about, and it's not just a one-off."

Local

Another student has been charged with bringing a gun to a Charlotte-Mecklenburg school. According to police, the incident happened Monday at West Charlotte High School. No further details were provided by CMPD. In just 17 days of class, this marks the eighth weapon— seven guns and a knife— to be found on school property.

Local

The County initially withheld $56 million from the school district after concerns of an inequality gap between minority students and white students. After harsh negotiations by both sides, CMS will not only get the amount originally requested, but an additional $12.1 million in overall funding.

Local

“We are dismayed that this funding dispute has reached the point where we must seek statutory resolution. But we will not stand by while the County impedes our efforts to educate students,” said Elyse Dashew, chair of the Board of Education. According to CMS, the county’s budget, which was approved and passed on the first day of the fiscal 2022 year (June 1), will leave the district underfunded by $81 million.

Local

A North Carolina judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by parents in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools who want to do away with students in virtual classrooms. The lawsuit filed last September alleged that student's productivity levels dropped without being in-person. The group also argued that kids without computers would fall behind if there was no real classroom instruction.