Health

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2017 photo, Sen. Dan Foreman, R-Moscow, waits for the State of the State address inside the House chambers at the state Capitol building in Boise, Idaho. Foreman said Monday, Feb. 19, 2018, he would call Idaho State Police if any student affiliate from Planned Parenthood stopped by his office. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger,File)
February 19, 2018 - 9:17 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A Republican state senator who yelled at University of Idaho students affiliated with Planned Parenthood now faces an ethics complaint after he posted on social media Monday that the students should discuss "killing babies" with his Democratic colleague. A dozen students, who...
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FILE - In a Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018 file photo, students hold their hands in the air as they are evacuated by police from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla, after a shooter opened fire on the campus. Frustration is mounting in the medical community as the Trump administration again points to mental illness in response to yet another mass shooting. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)
February 19, 2018 - 2:04 pm
Frustration is mounting in the medical community as the Trump administration again points to mental illness in response to yet another mass shooting. "The concept that mental illness is a precursor to violent behavior is nonsense," said Dr. Louis Kraus, forensic psychiatry chief at Chicago's Rush...
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February 19, 2018 - 1:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — There is no Harvard study that says a British children's television cartoon causes autism, despite what a social media post claims. In fact, there's at least one peer-reviewed study that hints that a children's television show may help autistic kids. The post on the newsely site,...
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FILE - In this May 24, 2014 file photo, Santa Barbara County Sheriff Bill Brown, right, walks past a board displaying photos of gunman Elliot Rodger and the weapons he used in a mass shooting in Isla Vista, Calif., after a news conference in Santa Barbara, Calif. A growing number of states have passed laws or are considering bills allowing courts to temporarily remove guns from individuals deemed a danger to themselves or others, an intervention that advocates say stops shootings and suicides by disturbed individuals. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
February 18, 2018 - 11:24 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The warnings around Nikolas Cruz seemed to flash like neon signs: expelled from school, fighting with classmates, a fascination with weapons and hurting animals, disturbing images and comments posted to social media, previous mental health treatment. In Florida, that wasn'...
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February 18, 2018 - 12:00 am
Few states let courts take guns from people deemed a threat Flu season shows signs of leveling off Ethics dispute erupts in Belgium over euthanasia rules Trump appeals California judge's curb on birth control rules Flu shot only 36 percent effective, making bad year worse Abortion-rights supporters...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2018, file photo California Attorney General Xavier Becerra talks during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. The U.S. Department of Justice is appealing a California judge's decision to temporarily block new Trump administration rules allowing more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control. Becerra sued the Trump administration in October challenging the new rules and on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, he said that the changes unjustly target women. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
February 16, 2018 - 5:13 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The U.S. Department of Justice is appealing a California judge's decision to temporarily block new Trump administration rules allowing more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. Lawyers filed the notice of appeal to the 9th District Court of Appeals...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014 file photo, protestors stand in front of a banner which reads "Euthanasia Stop", during an anti-euthanasia demonstration in Brussels. A disputed case of euthanasia in Belgium, involving the death of a dementia patient who never formally asked to die, has again raised concerns about weak oversight in a country with some of the world’s most liberal euthanasia laws. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
February 16, 2018 - 3:50 pm
A disputed case of euthanasia in Belgium, involving the death of a dementia patient who never formally asked to die, has again raised concerns about weak oversight in a country with some of the world's most liberal euthanasia laws. The case is described in a letter provided to The Associated Press...
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FILE - In this Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 file photo, lab technologist Sharda Modi tests a patient's swab for a flu infection at Upson Regional Medical Center in Thomaston, Ga. On Friday, Feb. 16, 2018, a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the flu season may finally be leveling off. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
February 16, 2018 - 12:37 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — This nasty flu season, which has been worsening for months, may finally be leveling off. Health officials on Friday said about 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That's no reason for health officials to celebrate yet:...
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February 16, 2018 - 12:00 am
Death of dementia patient stirs Belgium euthanasia fears Flu shot only 36 percent effective, making bad year worse Abortion-rights supporters push back against gains by foes McDonald's moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu Critics blast EPA for lowering Syngenta pesticide fine Report details harm...
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FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017, file photo, protesters carry banners during their march against the multinational agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology companies Monsanto and Syngenta in Basel, Switzerland. After a February 2018 announcement, critics are blasting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for dramatically lowering a fine on agribusiness company Syngenta for violations of pesticide regulations. (Georgios Kefalas/Keystone via AP, File)
February 15, 2018 - 7:22 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Critics are blasting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for dramatically lowering a fine on agribusiness company Syngenta for violations of pesticide regulations. Syngenta, under a settlement announced this week, will pay $150,000 for improperly using the pesticide...
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