Water environment

FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2016 photo, Palestinians gather at the Qatari-funded Hamad City housing complex in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip. Four years ago, Israel inflicted heavy damage on Gaza’s infrastructure during a bruising 50-day war with Hamas militants. Now, fearing a humanitarian disaster on its doorstep, Israel is appealing to the world to fund a series of big-ticket development projects in the war-torn area. The banners show Qatar's Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, left, and his father, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani. (AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra, File)
February 15, 2018 - 1:33 am
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Four years ago, Israel inflicted heavy damage on Gaza's infrastructure during a bruising 50-day war with Hamas militants. Now, fearing a humanitarian disaster on its doorstep, it's appealing to the world to fund a series of big-ticket development projects in the war-...
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February 13, 2018 - 11:58 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina environmental regulators have ordered a chemical company to take further steps to reduce emissions of chemicals that have questionable health effects. The state Department of Environmental Quality issued a notice of violation Monday telling Chemours to take more...
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FILE - In this May 31, 2002 file photo, the sun sets over the Mackinac Bridge and the Mackinac Straits as seen from Lake Huron. The bridge is the dividing line between Lake Michigan to the west and Lake Huron to the east. President Donald Trump again is trying to drastically reduce or eliminate federal support for cleanups of some iconic U.S. waterways. His proposed budget would slash Environmental Protection Agency funding for Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay restoration programs by 90 percent. It would kills all EPA spending on programs supporting other waters including San Francisco Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Puget Sound. The administration made a similar attempt last year but Congress refused to go along. (AP Photo/Al Goldis, File)
February 13, 2018 - 1:12 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — For a second consecutive year, President Donald Trump is trying to drastically reduce or eliminate federal support of cleanups for iconic U.S. waterways including the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. Trump's proposed 2019 budget for the Environmental Protection Agency...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the intersection of 8th Street and Atlantic Avenue is flooded in Ocean City, N.J., after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy flooded much of the town. New satellite research shows that global warming is making seas rise at an ever increasing rate. Scientists say melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica is speeding up sea level rise so that by the year 2100 on average oceans will be two feet higher than today, probably even more. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
February 12, 2018 - 4:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today,...
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FILE - In this Feb. 9, 2017 file photo, water flows through a break in the wall of the Oroville Dam spillway in Oroville, Calif. One year after the closest thing to disaster at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal dam regulators say they are looking hard at how they overlooked the built-in weaknesses of old dams like California's Oroville Dam for decades, and expect dam managers around the country to study their old dams and organizations equally hard. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)
February 11, 2018 - 12:18 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One year after the worst structural failures at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal regulators who oversee California's half-century-old, towering Oroville Dam say they are looking hard at how they overlooked its built-in weaknesses for decades. The Federal Energy...
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Pallets of drinking water are uploaded at Blades Elementary School, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Blades. Del. State environmental and public health officials announced late Thursday that sampling done at the request of the Environmental Protection Agency found that all three of the town of Blade's drinking water wells had high concentrations of perfluorinated compounds. (Jason Minto/The News Journal via AP)
February 09, 2018 - 6:05 pm
DOVER, Del. (AP) — Gov. John Carney has authorized the National Guard to assist residents of a southern Delaware town after high levels of toxic chemicals were discovered in municipal wells. Authorities said Friday that the Guard has provided two 400-gallon portable water tanks and coordinated...
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February 09, 2018 - 5:19 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Legislation designed to expand North Carolina's response to a little-studied chemical and other unregulated contaminants in drinking water supplies has cleared the state Senate. Senators approved a measure Friday that directs a review of the state's pollutant discharge...
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February 08, 2018 - 6:39 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Eighteen states, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, national coal industry interests and more than a dozen other groups are urging an appeals court to overturn a coal ash cleanup order at a federal utility's Tennessee plant, contending the decision will have wide-reaching,...
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February 08, 2018 - 3:59 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A state appeals court will hear whether it should allow a five-year-old lawsuit trying to force Duke Energy Corp. to clean up groundwater contaminated by its North Carolina coal ash pits. The Charlotte-based electricity utility argues to the Court of Appeals on Thursday that...
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February 07, 2018 - 9:08 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Virginia Senate panel advanced a measure Wednesday that would prevent Dominion Energy from capping its coal ash in place for at least another year while lawmakers study the issue, including recycling options. The bill would extend a moratorium on coal ash pond closures put in...
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