Personal tragedy shaped congressman's effort on health care

WASHINGTON (AP) -- New Jersey Rep. Tom MacArthur has experienced personal tragedy and understands the need for health insurance. "I lost my mother at 4 years old. My father had no insurance and I watched him until I was in college pay off medical bills," says the two-term Republican lawmaker. Years later, MacArthur suffered the anguish over the death of his 11-year-old daughter, Gracie. "We had over $1 million of medical bills.

Conservatives back revised health bill, GOP moderates balk

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The moribund Republican health care bill received a jolt of life Wednesday when the conservative House Freedom Caucus endorsed a revised version of the measure. But a leading GOP moderate criticized the reshaped legislation as a conservative exercise in "blame-shifting and face-saving" that wasn't winning new support from party centrists, leaving its fate unclear.

Americans offer hope, prayer in assessing Trump's 100 days

They are young and old: a high school student who can't yet vote, a Vietnam vet who did so proudly. They hail from all corners of the United States and very different walks of life: a "downhome boy" from Kentucky, a third-generation Mexican-American from Texas, a stay-at-home mom in Pennsylvania, an Iranian immigrant in Los Angeles. Some oppose Donald Trump and all that he stands for, while others voted enthusiastically for him.

Dispute over health payments defused, spending bill on track

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The White House and congressional Democrats on Wednesday defused a tense standoff over payments for the working poor under the health care law, keeping a massive government spending bill on track just days ahead of a shutdown deadline. President Donald Trump on Wednesday backed away from a threat to immediately withhold payments to help people with modest incomes with out-of-pocket medical expenses under Democrat Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.

Hardball health care option may cost Trump and taxpayers

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Counting down to a budget deadline, the White House has toyed with a hardball health care tactic to force Democrats to yield on President Donald Trump's priorities. The administration just might eliminate billions of dollars in disputed "Obamacare" subsidies. But a study out Tuesday from a nonpartisan group suggests that could backfire.

Trump's 100-days promises: Fewer than half carried out

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sure enough, the big trans-Pacific trade deal is toast, climate change action is on the ropes and various regulations from the Obama era have been scrapped. It's also a safe bet President Donald Trump hasn't raced a bicycle since Jan. 20, keeping that vow. Add a Supreme Court justice -- no small feat -- and call these promises kept.

Trump's 100-days promises: A long way to go on most of them

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sure enough, the big trans-Pacific trade deal is toast, climate change action is on the ropes and various regulations from the Obama era have been scrapped. It's also a safe bet President Donald Trump hasn't raced a bicycle since Jan. 20, keeping that vow. Add a Supreme Court justice -- no small feat -- and call these promises kept.

Trump backs away from demand for border wall money

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump stepped back Monday from demanding a down payment for his border wall in must-past spending legislation, potentially removing a major obstacle to a bipartisan deal just days ahead of a government shutdown deadline. Trump told a gathering of around 20 conservative media reporters Monday evening that he would be willing to return to the wall funding issue in September, according to two people who were in the room.

Trump heads into tough week with budget, health care battles

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump is heading into one of the most challenging weeks of his presidency, juggling a renewed health care push and a looming budget deadline. It's all complicated by a potential showdown with Democrats over paying for a border wall. The symbolic 100-day mark for the administration is Saturday. That's the same day government could shut down without a budget deal. Trump has announced a rally in Pennsylvania that day.

Trump's budget chief says money for border wall a must

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Money for the wall President Donald Trump wants to build along the U.S. border with Mexico must be part of the massive spending bill Congress is preparing, the White House budget director says. Additional funding also must be included to hire more immigration agents, Mick Mulvaney told The Associated Press in an interview in which he laid out the top priorities of the president.

White House pushes uncertain bid to revive health care bill

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Eager for a victory, the White House expressed confidence Thursday that a breakthrough on the mired Republican health care bill could be achieved in the House next week. The chamber's GOP leaders, burned by a March debacle on the measure, were dubious and signs were scant that an emerging plan was gaining enough votes to succeed.

State officials ask Congress to secure 'Obamacare' subsidies

WASHINGTON (AP) -- State officials are asking Congress to guarantee billions of dollars in health insurance subsidies under a legal cloud as a result of Republican opposition to "Obamacare." In a letter Wednesday to congressional leaders, the nonpartisan National Association of Insurance Commissioners said the so-called cost-sharing reductions are essential for keeping insurance markets stable next year. Insurers use the money to reduce deductibles and copayments for people with modest incomes.

Trump group's ads bolstering GOP Obamacare repeal drive

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A pro-Trump group is airing ads in a dozen Republican-held House districts aimed at drumming up support for the White House's wounded drive to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law. The $3 million campaign comes during a two-week congressional recess in which GOP lawmakers' town hall meetings have been rocked by liberal supporters of Obama's 2010 statute.

In Alaska, anxiety grows as debate over health care rages

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) -- Going without health insurance is a risk. Going without it in Alaska can be a gamble of a much higher order, for this is a place unlike anywhere else in the U.S., a land of pitiless cold, vast expanses and dangerous, back-breaking work such as pulling fishing nets from the water or hauling animal carcasses out of the woods. And yet many people on the Last Frontier do not carry insurance.

Trump's 'Obamacare' fixes don't impress insurers

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Trump administration released limited fixes Thursday for shaky health insurance markets, but insurers quickly said those actions won't guarantee stability for millions of consumers now covered. While calling it a step in the right direction, the industry is looking for a guarantee that the government will also keep paying billions in "cost-sharing" subsidies. And President Donald Trump says he hasn't made up his mind on that.

Conservative group's health ads slam top GOP lawmakers

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The conservative Club for Growth is targeting powerful committee chairmen and other top Republicans, part of an aggressive ad campaign to rally support for the GOP's struggling health care overhaul effort. The television and digital ads, unveiled earlier this week, pressure Republicans to a back a revised version of the GOP health care bill that Speaker Paul Ryan abruptly withdrew last month because it lacked the votes.

Conservative group's health care ads target GOP moderates

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The conservative Club for Growth is launching TV spots pressuring moderate Republican lawmakers to support the party's languishing health care overhaul drive, officials of the group said Monday in the latest salvo in the GOP civil war that derailed the House measure. The ads press moderates to back a revised version of the measure that the Trump administration offered last week in talks with conservative legislators.

GOP owns health care dilemma now, and voter skepticism

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Move over, "Obamacare." The health care debate has shifted to ideas from President Donald Trump and GOP lawmakers in Congress, and most people don't like what they see. With Republicans in command, their health care proposals as currently formulated have generated far more concern than enthusiasm.

Poll: Most young people say gov't should pay for health care

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Most young Americans want any health care overhaul under President Donald Trump to look a lot like the Affordable Care Act signed into law by his predecessor, President Barack Obama. But there's one big exception: A majority of young Americans dislike "Obamacare's" requirement that all Americans buy insurance or pay a fine.