Medical research

In this Oct. 12, 2017 photo, Mike Baughman, center, plays the bass with Sam Gibson, left, on guitar while Ryan Baughman, right, looks on at a cabin in Herald, W.Va. Mike Baughman is fighting a rare bile duct cancer he believes is a result of ingesting a parasite inside raw fish while serving in the Vietnam War. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has commissioned a pilot study, the first of its kind in the United States, to look into the link between liver flukes and the disease. (AP Photo/Margie Mason)
November 22, 2017 - 1:47 am
HEROLD, W.Va. (AP) — A half century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a new reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet — test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia. The Department of...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2015, file photo, a patron smokes a cigarette inside a bar in New Orleans hours before a smoking ban takes effect in bars, gambling halls and many other public places such as hotels, workplaces, private clubs and stores. Cigarette smoking, over-eating and other unhealthy behaviors can be blamed for nearly half of U.S. cancer deaths each year, according to a new American Cancer Society study released Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
November 21, 2017 - 12:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new look at cancer in the U.S. finds that nearly half of cancer deaths are caused by smoking, poor diet and other unhealthy behaviors. That's less than commonly-cited estimates from more than 35 years ago, a result of new research methods and changes in American society. Smoking...
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FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2014 file photo, a doctor injects a patient with a solution he says is rich in adult stem cells, at his practice in Beverly Hills, Calif. On Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration laid out a strategy for regulating cell-based medicine, amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that has received little oversight. (AP Photo/Raquel Maria Dillon)
November 16, 2017 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health authorities announced plans Thursday to crack down on doctors pushing stem cell procedures that pose the gravest risks to patients amid an effort to police a burgeoning medical field that previously has received little oversight. The Food and Drug Administration laid...
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November 15, 2017 - 8:40 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Todd Golde, University of Florida (THE CONVERSATION) Thirty years ago, scientists began to unlock the mysteries regarding the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. This knowledge ushered in an...
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CORRECTS NAME OF DISEASE TO HUNTER SYNDROME FROM NPS - In this photo taken Monday Nov. 6, 2017, Brian Madeux, 44, makes his way through the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in preparation for the first human gene editing therapy in Oakland, Calif. Madeux, who has Hunter syndrome, received the treatment on Monday, Nov. 13. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
November 15, 2017 - 10:19 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a...
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FILE - This Oct. 19, 2016, file photo shows the packaging of Vivitrol at an addiction treatment center in Joliet, Ill. The first U.S. study, published Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017 in the journal Lancet, comparing Vivitrol and Suboxone, two opioid addiction treatment drugs, finds that a monthly shot works about the same as a daily drug. The shot requires days of detox and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. (AP Photo/Carla K. Johnson, File)
November 14, 2017 - 6:43 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2014, file photo, a sign points the way to a hospital in Georgia. A study shows that Medicare patients with common illnesses who were treated by their own familiar primary care doctors were slightly more likely to survive after being sent home than those treated by hospitalists, internists who don't provide care outside of hospitals. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
November 13, 2017 - 1:28 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The old-fashioned, family doctor style of medicine could be lifesaving for elderly hospitalized patients, a big study suggests, showing benefits over a rapidly expanding alternative that has hospital-based doctors overseeing care instead. Medicare patients with common conditions...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 4, 2017 file photo, mannequins are arranged to train CPR to incoming medical students in Jackson, Miss. A study released on Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017 shows women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, and researchers think that reluctance to touch a woman's chest may be one reason. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
November 12, 2017 - 3:25 pm
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45...
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CORRECTS TO 7.8 BILLION In this Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017 photo, former coal miner Chuck Nelson looks out on the Brushy Fork impoundment in Raleigh County, in southern West Virginia, an estimated 7.8 billion gallon coal slurry containing sludge and chemicals from nearby surface mines. He says the slurries pollute the groundwater and contribute to high rates of cancer and other illnesses among the people living nearby. (AP Photo/Michael Virtanen)
November 11, 2017 - 9:50 am
GLEN DANIEL, W.Va. (AP) — Chuck Nelson spent his life in this corner of Appalachia, working for years in the coal mines — a good job in the economically depressed area. But he says the industry that helped him earn a living cost him his health, and his wife's, too. The 61-year-old Nelson blames his...
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