Medical research

April 23, 2018 - 4:15 pm
SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — Dick Vitale's voice cracked as he discussed his self-described obsession with raising money for pediatric cancer research. "It's the best thing I've ever done in my life," the longtime college basketball television analyst said. "I'm in 13 Hall of Fames, and none that compares...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2015, file photo, a couple holds hands during their wedding ceremony in Atlanta. In a report released on Wednesday, April 18, 2018, researchers found that melanoma patients who are married tend to be diagnosed at an earlier more treatable stage than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
April 18, 2018 - 11:44 am
CHICAGO (AP) — There's an extra bonus to marriage for melanoma patients: They tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced, a new study says. Spouses may be apt to notice suspicious moles on their partners that could signal melanoma, the...
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FILE - This May 23, 2017, file photo shows GW Pharmaceuticals’ Epidiolex, a medicine made from the marijuana plant but without TCH. The medicine reduced seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday, April 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Young, File)
April 17, 2018 - 2:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely watched medicine made from the marijuana plant reduces seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday. British drugmaker GW Pharmaceuticals is seeking permission to sell its purified form of an...
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FILE - This Aug. 15, 2017, file photo shows an arrangement of pills of the opioid oxycodone-acetaminophen in New York. Fatal drug overdoses are increasing organ donations, and researchers reported Monday, April 16, 2018, that people who receive those transplants generally fare as well as patients given organs from more traditional donors. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
April 16, 2018 - 6:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fatal drug overdoses are increasing organ donations, and researchers reported Monday that people who receive those transplants generally fare as well as patients given organs from more traditional donors. The findings could encourage more use of organs from overdose victims...
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This 2015 photo made available by Merck shows the drug Keytruda. Research released on Monday, April 16, 2018 suggests that many more lung cancer patients may benefit from treatments that boost the immune system, which have scored some of their biggest wins until now in less common cancer types. Using one of these drugs _ Merck's Keytruda _ with usual chemotherapy extended survival for people newly diagnosed with the most common type of cancer that had spread beyond the lungs, one study found. (Michael Lund/Merck via AP)
April 16, 2018 - 10:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It's the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers. In the study...
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In this image provided by the Conway (Ark.) Police Department, Robert Rook is seen in this June 3, 2016, photo. An Associated Press investigation finds that even as Hollywood moguls, elite journalists and politicians have been pushed out of their jobs or resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct, the world of medicine is more forgiving. Rook was allowed to keep his family practice open, so long as he’s chaperoned, despite facing multiple criminal charges for rape. Prosecutors subsequently downgraded the charges to more than 20 counts of sexual assault in the second- and third-degree, charges for which Rook says he is innocent. (Conway Police Department via AP)
April 15, 2018 - 12:19 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The first time that Dr. Anthony Bianchi came onto a patient, California's medical board alleged, the gynecologist placed a chair against the exam room door, put his fingers into the woman's vagina and exposed his erect penis. The second time, the board claimed, he told a patient...
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April 13, 2018 - 9:55 am
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — Research at the University of North Carolina shows genetic evidence supporting how loggerhead sea turtles use the Earth's magnetic fields to navigate back to the beaches where they were hatched. A study published Thursday in the journal Cell Biology shows that magnetic...
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FILE - This June 16, 2016 file photo made with a fisheye lens shows bottles of alcohol during a tour of a state liquor store in Salt Lake City. A large international study released on Thursday, April 12, 2018 says adults should average no more than one alcoholic drink per day, and that means many countries’ alcohol consumption guidelines may be far too loose. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
April 13, 2018 - 9:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Here's some sobering news: A large international study says adults should average no more than one alcoholic drink per day, and that means drinking guidelines in many countries may be far too loose. The study found that people who down more than seven drinks a week can expect to die...
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In this March 23, 2018 photo, Philip Ellison poses for a photo with Patton Ellison at his firm Outside Legal Counsel in Hemlock, Mich. If you were born in Michigan in July 1984 or later, you may be among more than five million people whose blood is being held by the state of Michigan, some of which may be used in medical research. Philip Ellison is suing the state on behalf of a group of parents who say the state did not obtain proper consent for their newborns' blood to be drawn or stored. (Henry Taylor/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)
April 12, 2018 - 4:01 pm
HEMLOCK, Mich. (AP) — A group of Michigan parents have filed a lawsuit alleging that the state didn't obtain proper consent to draw or store their newborns' blood for medical research. Saginaw County Attorney Philip Ellison filed the federal lawsuit on behalf of the parents, saying Michigan's...
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FILE - This 2016 digitally-colorized electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the Zika virus, in red, about 40 nanometers in diameter. A study released on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 suggests although signs of Zika infection can be seen in men’s semen for nearly a year, the risk of sexual transmission appears to fade in just one month. (Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC via AP)
April 11, 2018 - 5:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Signs of Zika infection can be seen in semen for as long as nine months, but the risk of sexual transmission appears to end in one month, according to a study published Wednesday. The study suggests health officials have been overly cautious in advising couples to abstain from sex...
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