Medical research

FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2005 file photo, Amanda Klopfer reacts as she is given a FluMist influenza vaccination in St. Leonard, Md. On Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, a federal panel says it's OK for doctors to start using the kid-friendly nasal spray flu vaccine again. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File)
February 21, 2018 - 5:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — It's OK for doctors to start using a kid-friendly nasal spray flu vaccine again, a federal panel said Wednesday. Two years ago, the advisory group pulled its recommendation for FluMist vaccine after research found it wasn't working against swine flu, the kind of flu that was making...
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February 21, 2018 - 6:46 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Lacey Wallace, Pennsylvania State University (THE CONVERSATION) On Valentine’s Day, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He...
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FILE - This Feb. 20, 2015 file photo, photo shows an arrangement of peanuts in New York. The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018 that its daily capsules of peanut flour helped sensitize children to nuts in a major study. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
February 20, 2018 - 3:46 pm
The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday that its daily capsules of peanut powder helped children build tolerance in a major study. Millions of children are allergic to peanuts, and some may have life-threatening reactions...
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FILE - This Sept. 15, 2011, file photo shows the nutrition label on a can of soda in Philadelphia. A precision nutrition weight loss approach didn't hold up in a study testing low fat versus low carb depending on dieters' genetic or metabolic makeup. Adults in the new study lost 13 pounds on average, regardless of diet, genes and insulin levels. What seemed to make a difference was healthful eating. Participants who consumed the fewest processed foods, sugary drinks and unhealthy fats lost the most weight. The study was published Tuesday, Feb 20, 2018, in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
February 20, 2018 - 12:47 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A precision nutrition approach to weight loss didn't hold up in a study testing low fat versus low carb depending on dieters' DNA profiles. Previous research has suggested that a person's insulin levels or certain genes could interact with different types of diets to influence weight...
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February 19, 2018 - 1:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — There is no Harvard study that says a British children's television cartoon causes autism, despite what a social media post claims. In fact, there's at least one peer-reviewed study that hints that a children's television show may help autistic kids. The post on the newsely site,...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018 file photo, a nurse prepares a flu shot from a vaccine vial at the Salvation Army in Atlanta. Most doses of vaccine are made in a production process that involves growing viruses in chicken eggs. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
February 15, 2018 - 4:17 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The flu vaccine is doing a poor job protecting older Americans and others against the bug that's causing most illnesses. Preliminary figures released Thursday suggest the vaccine is 36 percent effective overall in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a patient to the doctor'...
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February 12, 2018 - 6:43 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Laura Haynes, University of Connecticut (THE CONVERSATION) Every year, from 5 to 20 percent of the people in the United States will become infected with influenza virus. An average of...
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February 07, 2018 - 3:31 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A top University of Connecticut dental school professor was reprimanded over a selfie showing him and several students with two severed heads used for medical research, according to a document obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. The November letter by R. Lamont...
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FILE - In this September 2008 file photo, a physician discusses an ankle injury with a patient in Lawrence, Kan. Arthritis isn't always from the wear-and-tear of getting older _ too often, younger people get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. According to a study released Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, researchers are hunting for a new way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. (Mike Yoder/The Lawrence Journal-World via AP)
February 07, 2018 - 2:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Arthritis isn't always from the wear and tear of getting older — younger adults too often get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. Now researchers are hunting a way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. University of...
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In this Jan. 30, 2018, photo Pharmacist and researcher Alan Carter poses for a photo in Kansas City, Mo. Carter raised a stir with his recently published study finding that a variety of insulin vials he tested seemed to hold far less of the life-saving hormone than they should. Carter and colleagues did the testing in the labs of contract researcher MRIGlobal, where he worked until recently. Diabetes groups says Carter's study is flawed, but to reassure patients, they're organizing a much bigger study they expect will refute his findings. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
February 07, 2018 - 2:39 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself. The study author, a pharmacist, bought vials of insulin at a number of...
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