Lawmakers: Former Trump aide Flynn may have broken US law

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, appeared to violate federal law when he failed to seek permission or inform the U.S. government about accepting tens of thousands of dollars from Russian organizations after a trip there in 2015, leaders of a House oversight committee say.

The Latest: Flynn told DIA about Russia, lawyer says

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Latest on the congressional probe of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election (all times local): 1:20 p.m. An attorney for former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn says that his client told the Defense Intelligence Agency that he would be traveling to Moscow to attend a gala for a Russian state-sponsored television network.

Lawmakers suggest former Trump aide Flynn broke US law

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, appeared to violate federal law when he failed to seek permission or inform the U.S. government about accepting tens of thousands of dollars from Russian organizations after a trip there in 2015, leaders of a House oversight committee said Tuesday.

High court won't hear appeal over CIA torture report

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has turned away an appeal seeking to force the CIA to release the full 2014 Senate report about the agency's use of harsh interrogation tactics. The justices on Monday let stand an appeals court ruling that said the 6,900-page report prepared by the Senate Intelligence Committee was not subject to Freedom of Information laws.

Transcript of AP interview with Trump

A transcript of an Oval Office interview Friday with President Donald Trump by AP White House Correspondent Julie Pace. Where the audio recording of the interview is unclear, ellipses or a notation that the recording was unintelligible are used. AP: I do want to talk to you about the 100 days. TRUMP: Good. AP: I want to ask a few questions on some topics that are happening toward the end of the interview.

Transcript of AP interview with Trump

A transcript of an Oval Office interview Friday with President Donald Trump by AP White House Correspondent Julie Pace. Where the audio recording of the interview is unclear, ellipses or a notation that the recording was unintelligible are used. AP: I do want to talk to you about the 100 days. TRUMP: Good. AP: I want to ask a few questions on some topics that are happening toward the end of the interview.

Senators seek data on Americans caught up in surveillance

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A Democratic privacy advocate and libertarian-minded Republican are asking the nation's top intelligence official to release more information about the communications of American citizens swept up in surveillance operations. The request by Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon and GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky adds to a chorus of calls for more transparency about how intelligence agencies use and share communications to, from and about Americans.

House intel panel to hear from top officials on Russia probe

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Top law enforcement and intelligence officials are expected to testify next week on Capitol Hill about Russian activities to influence the U.S. presidential election. The House intelligence committee said Friday that it had sent letters requesting FBI Director James Comey and Adm. Mike Rogers, the head of the National Security Agency, to appear at a closed hearing on Tuesday.

Life in prison for convicted Florida Keys bomb plotter

MIAMI (AP) -- A judge imposed a life prison sentence Tuesday on a man convicted of plotting with an FBI informant to set off a nail-filled backpack bomb on a Florida Keys beach in solidarity with the Islamic State group. The attorney for Harlem Suarez had sought a more lenient sentence, but U.S. District Judge Jose Martinez agreed with prosecutors that the plot deserved the maximum.

Microsoft says users are protected from alleged NSA malware

PARIS (AP) -- Up-to-date Microsoft customers are safe from the purported National Security Agency spying tools dumped online, the software company said Saturday, tamping down fears that the digital arsenal was poised to wreak havoc across the internet . In a blog post , Microsoft Corp.

New leak suggests NSA penetrated Mideast banking networks

PARIS (AP) -- A new set of documents purportedly lifted from the U.S. National Security Agency suggests that American spies have burrowed deep into the Middle East's financial network, apparently compromising the Dubai office of the anti-money laundering and financial services firm EastNets. The company said Friday the documents were dated and denied that any customer data had been affected.

CIA director takes negative tone on group Trump has praised

WASHINGTON (AP) -- CIA Director Mike Pompeo has denounced the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks as a "hostile intelligence service" and a threat to U.S. national security, a condemnation that differed sharply from President Donald Trump's past praise of the organization. In his first public speech since becoming taking over the CIA, the former Republican congressman escalated the agency's hostility to WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, accusing them of making common cause with dictators.

CIA director calls WikiLeaks 'hostile intelligence service'

WASHINGTON (AP) -- CIA Director Mike Pompeo denounced the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks on Thursday as a "hostile intelligence service" and a threat to U.S. national security, a condemnation that differed sharply from President Donald Trump's past praise of the organization. In his first public speech since becoming America's spy master, the former Republican congressman escalated the agency's hostility to WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, accusing them of making common cause with dictators.

US judge deems mentally ill man fit for trial in terror case

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) -- A federal judge on Thursday declared a mentally ill man fit for trial on a terrorism charge 10 months after the man started getting forcible injections with drugs that made him competent to defend himself in court. But a defense attorney for the North Carolina man accused of trying to join al-Qaida-linked fighters in Syria said he will ask the U.S.

Trump boasts of hiring only the best, but picks haunt him

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump likes to boast that he hires only the best people. But his personnel choices keep coming back to haunt him. One of the people Trump hired for the White House was working as a foreign agent while advising him during the election. His campaign chairman caught the Justice Department's attention for similarly surreptitious work.

Chicago-area chef, cancer worker charged in terrorist case

CHICAGO (AP) -- Two suburban Chicago men who posed for photos holding a black Islamic State group flag at a Lake Michigan beach park were arrested Wednesday on federal terrorist charges, and an undercover operative said one of the men suggested homosexuals should be thrown off the city's tallest building. An FBI sting begun in 2015 compiled evidence that Joseph D.

Report: US sought to monitor Trump adviser last summer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The FBI obtained a secret court order last summer to monitor the communications of Carter Page, an adviser to then-candidate Donald Trump, because the government had reason to believe Page was acting as a Russian agent, The Washington Post has reported. Page is among the Trump associates under scrutiny as the FBI and congressional committees investigate whether his presidential campaign had ties to Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

Report: US sought to monitor Trump adviser last summer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The FBI obtained a secret court order last summer to monitor the communications of Carter Page, an adviser to then-candidate Donald Trump, because the government had reason to believe Page was acting as a Russian agent, The Washington Post reported Tuesday. Page is among the Trump associates under scrutiny as the FBI and congressional committees investigate whether his presidential campaign had ties to Russia's meddling in the 2016 election.

Symantec says CIA tools found across 16 countries

LONDON (AP) -- The CIA's cyberespionage toolkit made public by WikiLeaks has been linked to 40 spying operations in 16 countries, an early public assessment of the intelligence agency's global hacking operations, computer security company Symantec said Monday. In a blog post published , the California-based Symantec Corp. said the tools in WikiLeaks' recent releases have been linked to the electronic infiltration of international, financial, energy and aerospace organizations across the world.