Eye health

FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, Dr. Albert Maguire, right, checks the eyes of Misa Kaabali, 8, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Misa was 4-years-old when he received his gene therapy treatment. The first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000, less than the $1 million price tag that had been expected, but it's still among the most expensive genetic therapies in the world. Spark Therapeutics said it decided on the lower price tag for Luxturna, after hearing from health insurers about their ability to cover the injectable treatment. (AP Photo/Bill West, File)
January 03, 2018 - 6:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000 per patient, making it one of the most expensive medicines in the world and raising questions about the affordability of a coming wave of similar gene-targeting therapies. The injectable treatment from Spark...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, Dr. Albert Maguire, right, checks the eyes of Misa Kaabali, 8, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Misa was 4-years-old when he received his gene therapy treatment. The first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000, less than the $1 million price tag that had been expected, but it's still among the most expensive genetic therapies in the world. Spark Therapeutics said it decided on the lower price tag for Luxturna, after hearing from health insurers about their ability to cover the injectable treatment. (AP Photo/Bill West, File)
December 19, 2017 - 1:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday approved the nation's first gene therapy for an inherited disease, a treatment that improves the sight of patients with a rare form of blindness. It marks another major advance for the emerging field of genetic medicine. The approval for Spark...
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FILE- In this April 28, 2017 file photo, Dr. Salomon Melgen arrives at the federal courthouse in West Palm Beach, Fla. Prosecutors say Melgen, a prominent Florida eye doctor who was accused of bribing New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez, should get a 30-year sentence for Medicare fraud. A three-day sentencing hearing for Melgen is scheduled to begin Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, in West Palm Beach on 67 counts. Prosecutors say the 63-year-old doctor stole more than $100 million from the federal government. He was convicted in April after a 2 1/2- month trial.(Lannis Water/Palm Beach Post via AP, File)
December 07, 2017 - 5:03 pm
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Evidence proves a politically connected Florida eye doctor convicted of Medicare fraud stole $136 million, prosecutors insisted on Thursday, countering a defense argument that the fraud added up to just $64,000. Assistant U.S. Attorney Alexandra Chase said Dr. Salomon...
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November 21, 2017 - 4:23 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Advocacy groups have sued Hulu in an effort to force the subscription streaming service to provide an audio track that helps people who are blind or visually impaired enjoy TV shows and movies. The federal lawsuit filed in Boston on Monday asks the court to declare that Hulu's failure...
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In this Oct. 16, 2017 file photo, Blake Lively poses for a portrait in New York to promote her latest film, "All I See Is You," where she plays a blind woman who regains her sight. (Photo by Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP)
October 25, 2017 - 2:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — To play a blind woman for her latest film role, Blake Lively took no short cuts into the darkness. The 30-year-old actress learned to use a walking cane, wore opaque contact lenses off-camera to better understand her character and learned how to navigate the main set without her...
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Dr. Barry Byrne listens to testimony concerning the approval of a potentially breakthrough drug for a form of blindness during a meeting of the The Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies advisory committee, Thursday, Oct. 12. 2017, at the FDA in Silver Spring, Md. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
October 12, 2017 - 7:55 pm
SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A potentially groundbreaking treatment for a rare form of blindness moved one step closer to U.S. approval Thursday, as federal health advisers endorsed the experimental gene therapy for patients with an inherited condition that gradually destroys eyesight. The panel...
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October 10, 2017 - 4:51 pm
In a story Oct. 9 about an experimental gene therapy for blindness, The Associated Press erroneously reported the deadline for a decision by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The date is Jan. 12, not Jan. 18. A corrected version of the story is below: Seeing hope: FDA panel considers gene...
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In this Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, photo, Beth Guardino, left, and her son, Christian, talk about the 17-year-old's life before and after gene therapy treatment for his hereditary blindness during an interview at their home in Patchogue, N.Y. Christian was diagnosed with hereditary blindness and received gene therapy as part of a study. On Thursday, Oct. 12, U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisers will consider whether to recommend approval of the gene therapy. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
October 09, 2017 - 10:47 pm
A girl saw her mother's face for the first time. A boy tore through the aisles of Target, marveling at toys he never knew existed. A teen walked onto a stage and watched the stunned expressions of celebrity judges as he wowed "America's Got Talent." Caroline, Cole, Christian. All had mere glimmers...
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Southern California long snapper Jake Olson leads the USC Trojan Marching Band following an NCAA college football game against Western Michigan, Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017, in Los Angeles. Olson lost his sight eight years ago to a rare form of retinal cancer, but joined the USC team on a scholarship for disabled athletes and began practicing with the Trojans 2 years ago. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
September 03, 2017 - 12:06 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jake Olson first imagined this moment long before he lost his vision to cancer eight years ago. Southern California scored a touchdown. Coach Clay Helton turned to the sideline and yelled his name: "Are you ready? Let's get this done!" The blind long snapper's teammates guided...
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Southern California long snapper Jake Olson leads the USC Trojan Marching Band following an NCAA college football game against Western Michigan, Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017, in Los Angeles. Olson lost his sight eight years ago to a rare form of retinal cancer, but joined the USC team on a scholarship for disabled athletes and began practicing with the Trojans 2 years ago. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
September 02, 2017 - 11:15 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jake Olson first imagined this moment long before he lost his vision to cancer eight years ago. Southern California scored a touchdown. Coach Clay Helton turned to the sideline and yelled his name: "Are you ready? Let's get this done!" The blind long snapper's teammates guided...
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