Day heads home as his mother faces lung cancer surgery

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) -- Six holes into his opening match, Jason Day walked off the golf course. It was the fourth time in the last three years that he withdrew in the middle of a tournament. Only this was different. Physically, he never felt better. Emotionally, he was a wreck.

Ex-pharmacy exec convicted in deadly meningitis outbreak

BOSTON (AP) -- The former head of a Massachusetts pharmacy was acquitted Wednesday of murder allegations but convicted of racketeering and other crimes in a meningitis outbreak that was traced to fungus-contaminated drugs and killed 64 people across the country. Prosecutors said Barry Cadden, 50, ran the business in an "extraordinarily dangerous" way by disregarding unsanitary conditions to boost production and make more money.

Bird flu confirmed in 2 poultry flocks in north Alabama

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) -- Alabama officials have confirmed bird flu in two poultry flocks, just a week after three commercial breeders had to kill their chickens across the state line in Tennessee. The state veterinarian announced that chickens are under quarantine after testing positive for the disease at a commercial breeding operation in Pickens County near the Mississippi line. Dr.

Patients' reports may aid prostate cancer treatment choice

CHICAGO (AP) -- Men with early-stage prostate cancer face a dizzying quandary over which treatment to choose but two new studies on side effects may make those decisions a bit easier. The research bolsters evidence that sexual problems and urinary incontinence are more common after surgery than after radiation or "watchful waiting" without treatment.

Thailand's coin-eating turtle dies of blood poisoning

BANGKOK (AP) -- Tourists in eastern Thailand used to toss coins at a green sea turtle that lived in a pond in eastern Thailand, wishing for luck and longevity. But swallowing the shiny tidbits turned out to be a death sentence for the reptile. After having nearly a thousand coins removed from its stomach in a four-hour operation two weeks ago, the turtle -- nicknamed "Omsin," or "Piggy Bank," -- died Tuesday.

Chicago-based group brings smiles to deaf Syrian children

BAR ELIAS, Lebanon (AP) -- Six-year-old Aya al-Souqi, a Syrian refugee, held the camera phone up to her gaze and listened to hear her mother. "I hear you!" she exclaimed. It was only the second time she'd spoken to her mother in Beeskow, Germany since getting fitted with a hearing aid by a Chicago-based charity to treat an invisible wound of the Syrian war.

Column: Another sobering reminder of the price players pay

The news seemed unimaginable, much as it might have 78 years ago when Yankees fans learned Lou Gehrig was diagnosed with the disease that would later bear his name. It came on a Sunday night via a more modern form of communication, a Twitter feed. Dwight Clark didn't need the full 140 characters to stun football fans everywhere. "I wanted to share some unfortunate news: I have ALS," Clark tweeted .

Use of genetically modified mosquitoes considered in Houston

HOUSTON (AP) -- Officials are considering releasing genetically modified mosquitoes in Houston as part of the fight against the insects known to carry diseases such as the Zika virus. The Houston Chronicle (http://bit.ly/2mLrfyy ) reports that Harris County, Texas, officials are negotiating with a British biotech company, Oxitec, to release mosquitoes that have been genetically engineered to produce offspring that die. Oxitec has yet to try out its technology in the U.S.

3 Tennessee death row inmates lose Supreme Court appeals

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court has rejected appeals from three Tennessee death-row inmates who say they should not be executed because they are intellectually disabled. The justices on Monday left in place state court rulings upholding the death sentences of inmates Pervis Payne, Michael Sample and Vincent Sims. The three men said Tennessee has refused to apply a 2014 Supreme Court ruling that affects inmates with borderline cases of intellectual disability.

Weekend Sports In Brief

MEN'S NCAA TOURNAMENT A scintillating Sunday of games jolted the men's NCAA Tournament to life like a triple shot of espresso. North Carolina, the South Region No. 1 seed, had the most frenetic finish, blowing a 17-point lead and then scoring the game's final 12 points to hold off Arkansas. South Carolina, the No. 7 seed in the East, had the biggest takedown, knocking off No.

BC-AP Sports Digest

The supervisor is Dennis Waszak, followed by Fred Lief at 9 a.m. The New York sports desk can be reached at 800-845-8450, ext. 1630. Sports Photos, ext. 1918; graphics, ext. 7636; agate, ext. 1635. AP stories and accompanying photos also can be obtained from http://www.apexchange.com For reruns, call the Service Desk (800 838-4616) or your local AP bureau. All times EDT. TOP STORIES BKC--NCAA-BIG-JOLT SUNDAY SACRAMENTO, Calif.

Dwight Clark says he has ALS, suspects football a cause

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Dwight Clark revealed Sunday that he has Lou Gehrig's disease and suspects playing football might have caused the illness. Clark announced on Twitter that he has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease that attacks cells that control muscles. The former San Francisco 49ers wide receiver linked to a post on his personal blog detailing his ALS diagnosis, but the site crashed Sunday night, apparently from an overflow of traffic.

A Muppet with autism to be welcomed soon on 'Sesame Street'

NEW YORK (AP) -- Folks on Sesame Street have a way of making everyone feel accepted. That certainly goes for Julia, a Muppet youngster with blazing red hair, bright green eyes -- and autism. Rather than being treated like an outsider, which too often is the plight of kids on the spectrum, Julia is one of the gang.

To aid ferrets, vaccine treats planned for prairie dogs

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) -- Feeding peanut butter kibbles to millions of prairie dogs -- by flinging the treats from four-wheelers and dropping them from drones -- could be the next big thing to help a spunky little weasel that almost went extinct. Slinky with a robber-like black mask across its eyes, the endangered black-footed ferret is a fierce predator.

Indigenous Bolivians have some of the healthiest hearts

LONDON (AP) -- Deep in the Bolivian Amazon lives a group of indigenous people who spend their days hunting and farming. Researchers say this may be partly why they have some of the healthiest hearts on the planet. The Tsimane, a society of hunter-gatherers, have the lowest-ever recorded levels of clogged arteries among any population studied, new research found.

Toddler with Down syndrome models for British retailer

LONDON (AP) -- A British clothing retailer is featuring a toddler girl with Down Syndrome as a model in its stores across the United Kingdom. Britain's ITV reports that Lily Beddall's picture is hanging on the walls of 217 Matalan locations in the U.K. Her mother, Vicki Beddall, took Lily to see her picture in one of the stores and posted the moment on Facebook .

Health groups: Next cure may go undiscovered with Trump cuts

WASHINGTON (AP) -- What goes on the chopping block: Research into cancer or Alzheimer's? A Zika vaccine or a treatment for superbugs? Health groups say President Donald Trump's proposal to slash funds for the nation's engine of biomedical research would be devastating for patients with all kinds of diseases -- and for jobs.

Cholesterol drug cuts heart risks, spurs new debate on cost

A long-acting cholesterol medicine cut the risk of having a heart attack or some other serious problems by 15 to 20 percent in a big study that's likely to spur fresh debate about what drugs should cost. Statins such as Lipitor and Crestor are cheap and lower LDL or bad cholesterol, but some people can't tolerate or get enough help from them.