Health

FILE - In a Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017 file photo, Dr. Jerome Adams waits to be sworn in as the 20th U.S. Surgeon General by Vice President Mike Pence in Washington. Adams says he gave assistance to someone on a Delta Air Lines flight Wednesday, May 16, 2018, to Jackson, Mississippi. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
May 16, 2018 - 9:47 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — When the call went out for a doctor on board, the U.S. surgeon general says he gladly stepped in to help with a medical emergency on a commercial flight. Dr. Jerome Adams, an anesthesiologist, said he assisted someone on a Delta Air Lines jet as he prepared to fly Wednesday to...
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This undated image made available by F. Hoffmann-La Roche shows a vial of the company's Herceptin medication. According to a study released on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it can cause. (F. Hoffmann-La Roche via AP)
May 16, 2018 - 9:26 pm
Many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it sometimes can cause, a study suggests. It's good news, but it comes nearly two decades after the...
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In this May 9, 2018 photo, President Donald Trump holds up an executive order he signed as he is surrounded by first lady Melania Trump, second from right, Karen Pence, right, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, third from left, Ivanka Trump, fourth from left, and others during a celebration of military mothers and spouses event in the East Room of the White House in Washington. The House is set to give veterans more leeway to see doctors outside the Department of Veterans Affairs' health system. It's part of an effort to fulfill President Donald Trump's promise to expand private care for veterans. The long-awaited plan is set for a House vote later Wednesday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 16, 2018 - 8:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted Wednesday to give veterans more freedom to see doctors outside the Veterans Affairs health system, a major shift aimed at reducing wait times and improving medical care despite the concerns of some Democrats who cast it as a risky step toward dismantling the...
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John Morgan, who helped get Florida’s medical marijuana amendment on the ballot and passed in 2016, takes questions before a trial on whether the ban on smoking cannabis is allowed under the state constitution on Wednesday, May 16, 2018, in Tallahassee, Fla. (AP Photo/Joe Reedy)
May 16, 2018 - 6:57 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida judge will soon decide if patients approved to use medical marijuana will be allowed to smoke it. Leon County circuit court Judge Karen Gievers heard testimony Wednesday from two women with terminal illnesses challenging the state's ban on smoking cannabis. Voters...
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This undated photo provided by US WorldMeds shows Lucemyra. Federal regulators have approved the first nonopioid treatment to ease withdrawal symptoms from quitting opioids. (US WorldMeds via AP)
May 16, 2018 - 6:21 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Federal regulators have approved the first nonopioid treatment to ease withdrawal symptoms from quitting addictive opioids. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration expedited approval of Lucemyra (luc-eh-MEER'-eh) to help combat the U.S. opioid epidemic. The tablet was approved...
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May 16, 2018 - 6:16 pm
MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont has become the first state to create a program to import more affordable prescription drugs from Canada. But it's unclear whether it will happen because it needs federal approval and the White House hasn't endorsed it. Republican Gov. Phil Scott said Wednesday the law...
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May 16, 2018 - 10:07 am
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Thousands of doses of the experimental Ebola vaccine have arrived in Congo's capital amid the latest outbreak of the deadly disease, the health ministry said Wednesday. The 4,000 doses will be sent to the remote northwest where two confirmed Ebola cases, 20 probable ones and...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 24, 2016, file photo provided by Niels Alpert, Betsy Davis smiles during her "Right To Die Party" in Ojai, Calif. Davis threw herself the party as she became one of the first to use a California law to take her own life in 2016. Advocates say the terminally ill may die tougher deaths after a judge on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, threw out the law that allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs. (Niels Alpert via AP, File)
May 16, 2018 - 7:53 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Betsy Davis threw herself a party before becoming one of the first people to use a California law allowing her to take her own life in 2016. Her sister and other advocates fear others won't have the same choice after a Riverside County judge threw out the law Tuesday...
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In a Nov. 15, 2017 photo, Cherokee citizen Judith Anderson examines the scar tissue on her left arm from years of IV drug use outside the Redbird Smith Health Center in Sallisaw, Okla. Anderson is among hundreds of tribal citizens who have tested positive for hepatitis C in the past three years because of dangerous drug use. She's being treated for the potentially fatal liver disease thanks to a hepatitis C eradication program launched in 2015 by the tribe, partly to respond to the nation's opioid epidemic. (AP Photo/Justin Juozapavicius)
May 16, 2018 - 1:17 am
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — Recovering addict Judith Anderson figures if she hadn't entered a program that caught and treated the hepatitis C she contracted after years of intravenous drug use, she wouldn't be alive to convince others to get checked out. The 74-year-old resident of Sallisaw, Oklahoma...
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File - In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo, supporters of a measure to allow the terminally ill to end their own life march at the Capitol while calling on California Gov. Jerry Brown to sign the bill in Sacramento, Calif. A California judge on Tuesday, May15, 2018, threw out a 2016 state law allowing the terminally ill to end their lives, ruling it was unconstitutionally approved by the Legislature. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
May 15, 2018 - 10:39 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A California judge on Tuesday threw out a 2016 state law allowing the terminally ill to end their lives, ruling it was unconstitutionally approved by the Legislature. Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia said lawmakers acted illegally in passing the law...
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