Health

In this Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, photo, Brad Sippy, chief executive officer of Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., stands for a portrait in Cambridge, Mass. Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a small startup trying to bring the recalled painkiller Vioxx back to the market. They are seeking FDA approval for patients with hemophilia with severe pain, but once on the market, doctors could go back to prescribing it to anyone with pain. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
November 21, 2017 - 11:02 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Could there be a second life for the once-popular arthritis pill Vioxx? A startup pharmaceutical company hopes so. Merck & Co. voluntarily pulled the blockbuster drug in 2004 amid evidence that it doubled the chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Now tiny Tremeau...
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In this Thursday, April 28, 2016 photo, Theo Ramos, 14, draws in his sketch book at his neighborhood park in Homestead, Fla. Born a girl, he felt more like a boy. He wanted to be called Theo instead of the name he was given at birth _ he wrote a detailed letter to teachers, explaining which pronouns he preferred and citing school policy on LGBTQ inclusion. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
November 21, 2017 - 3:52 am
HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — It was May of seventh grade, and 14-year-old Theo Ramos was in a new school. Perhaps because it was an arts magnet program, or because it was a diverse place, kids and adults seemed to embrace the transgender boy much more than those at his old school did. There were fewer...
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November 21, 2017 - 12:00 am
Big Tobacco's anti-smoking ads begin after decade of delay Startup wants to bring back Vioxx for hemophilia joint pain Self-harm, suicide attempts climb among US girls, study says VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing vets Nearly half of US cancer deaths blamed on unhealthy behavior...
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FILE - In this June 8, 2006 file photo, then Deputy Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar meets reporters at the HHS Department in Washington. Newly disclosed financial records show that Azar, President Donald Trump’s nominee to become secretary for the Health and Human Services Department, reaped big earnings during his tenure as a top pharmaceutical executive. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
November 20, 2017 - 3:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly disclosed financial records show that President Donald Trump's nominee to become Health and Human Services secretary reaped big earnings during his tenure as a top pharmaceutical executive. As a top drug industry veteran from 2007 to 2017, former Eli Lilly and Co. executive...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an event to declare the opioid crisis a national public health emergency in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Trump declared opioid abuse a national public health emergency at the White House in October. Trump announced an advertising campaign to combat what he said is the worst drug crisis in the nation's history, but he did not direct any new federal funding toward the effort. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
November 20, 2017 - 2:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that the opioid epidemic is "ravaging so many American families and communities." It also appears to be more expensive than previously thought, according to a government analysis released Monday. The White House Council of Economic Advisers pegs...
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Kyle Graves, who is in recovery for opioid addition, sits in the home he shares with his mother in Franklin, Tenn., Tuesday, June 6, 2017. Graves' troubles began more than a decade ago when he sought relief for degenerative arthritis in his hips, shoulders, feet and back. He was prescribed oxycodone, an opioid drug that works best for short-term pain but is risky and potentially addictive when used long-term. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
November 20, 2017 - 10:46 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — It's hard to say whether businessman Kyle Graves hit rock bottom when he shot himself in the ankle so emergency room doctors would feed his opioid habit or when he broke into a safe to steal his father's cancer pain medicine. For straight-talking ex-trucker Jeff McCoy, it...
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In this Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015 photo, Theo Ramos, 14, meets with an endocrinologist in Miami. When Theo Ramos was in fifth grade, he felt like a boy, but every month the pain of menstruation cramps reminded him of the reality of the gender assigned at birth. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
November 20, 2017 - 9:57 am
HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — Theo Ramos learned how to cut himself when he was in fifth grade, when his body seemed to revolt. Exploring online was easy, with hashtags like #scars, #hurt and #brokeninside. Nothing made sense back then, but Theo absorbed what he saw on websites like a religion. All he...
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In this Oct. 18, 2017 photo, the Healthcare.gov website is seen on a computer screen in Washington. Consumers are getting the word that taxpayer-subsidized health plans are widely available for next year for no monthly premium, and marketing companies say they’re starting to see an impact on sign-ups. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
November 20, 2017 - 3:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers are getting the word that taxpayer-subsidized health plans are widely available for next year for no monthly premium or little cost, and marketing companies say they're starting to see an impact on sign-ups. "Free Obamacare Coverage in 2018," says an online pitch from...
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November 20, 2017 - 12:00 am
'It never really leaves you.' Opioids haunt users' recovery White House: True cost of opioid epidemic tops $500 billion Theo's journey: A transgender child at war with his body Hard to believe: Some consumers find free health insurance Station: Video shows nurses laughing as 89-year-old dies...
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FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an event to declare the opioid crisis a national public health emergency in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Trump declared opioid abuse a national public health emergency at the White House in October. Trump announced an advertising campaign to combat what he said is the worst drug crisis in the nation's history, but he did not direct any new federal funding toward the effort. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
November 19, 2017 - 7:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says the true cost of the opioid drug epidemic in 2015 was $504 billion, or roughly half a trillion dollars. In an analysis to be released Monday, the Council of Economic Advisers says the figure is more than six times larger than the most recent estimate. The...
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