Health

In this Oct. 12, 2017 photo, Mike Baughman, center, plays the bass with Sam Gibson, left, on guitar while Ryan Baughman, right, looks on at a cabin in Herald, W.Va. Mike Baughman is fighting a rare bile duct cancer he believes is a result of ingesting a parasite inside raw fish while serving in the Vietnam War. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has commissioned a pilot study, the first of its kind in the United States, to look into the link between liver flukes and the disease. (AP Photo/Margie Mason)
November 22, 2017 - 1:47 am
HEROLD, W.Va. (AP) — A half century after serving in Vietnam, hundreds of veterans have a new reason to believe they may be dying from a silent bullet — test results show some men may have been infected by a slow-killing parasite while fighting in the jungles of Southeast Asia. The Department of...
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FILE – This undated file photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Alva Campbell, convicted of fatally shooting Charles Dials, during a carjacking in 1997. Campbell, whose poor veins led Ohio to halt his execution, has appealed a judge’s decision upholding the state’s lethal injection system. Campbell argues that Ohio's process raises an unconstitutional risk of serious harm because the first of three drugs may not render inmates completely unconscious. Lawyers for Campbell and fellow death row inmate Raymond Tibbetts announced the appeal to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP, File)
November 22, 2017 - 12:39 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A condemned killer whose poor veins led Ohio to halt his execution has appealed a judge's decision upholding the state's lethal injection system. Death row inmate Alva Campbell argues that Ohio's process raises an unconstitutional risk of serious harm because the first of...
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November 22, 2017 - 12:00 am
Australian state reaches brink of legalizing mercy killings Big Tobacco's anti-smoking ads begin after decade of delay Self-harm, suicide attempts climb among US girls, study says VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing veterans Ohio killer who survived execution files new court appeal...
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FILE - This Friday, April 7, 2017, file photo, shows cigarette butts discarded in an ashtray outside a New York office building. Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies are returning to prime-time television, but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11 years after a judge ruled that the companies had misled the public about the dangers of cigarettes. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
November 21, 2017 - 3:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Decades after they were banned from the airwaves, Big Tobacco companies return to prime-time television this weekend — but not by choice. Under court order, the tobacco industry for the first time will be forced to advertise the deadly, addictive effects of smoking, more than 11...
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November 21, 2017 - 3:45 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Attempted suicides, drug overdoses, cutting and other types of self-injury have increased substantially in U.S. girls, a 15-year study of emergency room visits found. It's unclear why, but some mental health experts think cyberbullying, substance abuse and economic stress from the...
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FILE - In this April 21, 2015, file photo, a patron smokes a cigarette inside a bar in New Orleans hours before a smoking ban takes effect in bars, gambling halls and many other public places such as hotels, workplaces, private clubs and stores. Cigarette smoking, over-eating and other unhealthy behaviors can be blamed for nearly half of U.S. cancer deaths each year, according to a new American Cancer Society study released Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
November 21, 2017 - 12:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new look at cancer in the U.S. finds that nearly half of cancer deaths are caused by smoking, poor diet and other unhealthy behaviors. That's less than commonly-cited estimates from more than 35 years ago, a result of new research methods and changes in American society. Smoking...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017, photo, Brad Sippy, chief executive officer of Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., stands for a portrait in Cambridge, Mass. Tremeau Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a small startup trying to bring the recalled painkiller Vioxx back to the market. They are seeking FDA approval for patients with hemophilia with severe pain, but once on the market, doctors could go back to prescribing it to anyone with pain. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
November 21, 2017 - 11:02 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Could there be a second life for the once-popular arthritis pill Vioxx? A startup pharmaceutical company hopes so. Merck & Co. voluntarily pulled the blockbuster drug in 2004 amid evidence that it doubled the chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Now tiny Tremeau...
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In this Thursday, April 28, 2016 photo, Theo Ramos, 14, draws in his sketch book at his neighborhood park in Homestead, Fla. Born a girl, he felt more like a boy. He wanted to be called Theo instead of the name he was given at birth _ he wrote a detailed letter to teachers, explaining which pronouns he preferred and citing school policy on LGBTQ inclusion. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
November 21, 2017 - 3:52 am
HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — It was May of seventh grade, and 14-year-old Theo Ramos was in a new school. Perhaps because it was an arts magnet program, or because it was a diverse place, kids and adults seemed to embrace the transgender boy much more than those at his old school did. There were fewer...
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November 21, 2017 - 12:00 am
Big Tobacco's anti-smoking ads begin after decade of delay Startup wants to bring back Vioxx for hemophilia joint pain Self-harm, suicide attempts climb among US girls, study says VA study shows parasite from Vietnam may be killing vets Nearly half of US cancer deaths blamed on unhealthy behavior...
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FILE - In this June 8, 2006 file photo, then Deputy Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar meets reporters at the HHS Department in Washington. Newly disclosed financial records show that Azar, President Donald Trump’s nominee to become secretary for the Health and Human Services Department, reaped big earnings during his tenure as a top pharmaceutical executive. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
November 20, 2017 - 3:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly disclosed financial records show that President Donald Trump's nominee to become Health and Human Services secretary reaped big earnings during his tenure as a top pharmaceutical executive. As a top drug industry veteran from 2007 to 2017, former Eli Lilly and Co. executive...
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