Food and drink

A worker lifts a lunch bowl off the production line at Spyce, a restaurant which uses a robotic cooking process, in Boston, Thursday, May 3, 2018. Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but the new restaurant in Boston is employing what it calls a "never-before-seen robotic kitchen" to cook up ingredients and spout them into a bowl. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
May 03, 2018 - 3:31 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Robots can't yet bake a souffle or fold a burrito, but they can cook up vegetables and grains and spout them into a bowl — and are doing just that at a new fast casual restaurant in Boston. Seven autonomously swirling cooking pots — what the restaurant calls a "never-before-seen...
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FILE - This undated photo shows romaine lettuce in Houston. On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its numbers on the outbreak Wednesday, revealing that 149 people had gotten sick in 29 states. (Steve Campbell/Houston Chronicle via AP)
May 02, 2018 - 5:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The first death has been reported in a national food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce. The death was reported in California, but state and federal health officials did not provide any other details. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its numbers on...
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Workers plant romaine lettuce, Thursday, April 26, 2018, at the EG Richter Family Farm in Puyallup, Wash. The farm sells most of it's lettuce to large local grocery store chains, and owner Tim Richter says that so far his farm hasn't been affected by warnings that romaine lettuce from Yuma, Ariz., apparently has been contaminated with the E. coli bacteria. Richter says he urges consumers to stay away from bagged lettuce and to always cut and wash their own produce. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
April 27, 2018 - 2:18 pm
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Restaurants' advice to their customers? Romaine calm. The government is still investigating how romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona, apparently became contaminated with E. coli bacteria. As of Friday, at least 98 people in 22 states have gotten sick, according to the U.S...
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In this April 12, 2018 photo, scientist Karen Xavier holds a petri dish containing a stool sample of small bacteria colonies in Denver. DNA from samples like these are extracted and sequenced to help health investigators more quickly determine the source of a food borne illness outbreak.(AP Photo/P. Solomon Banda)
April 26, 2018 - 1:27 am
ATLANTA (AP) — Disease hunters are using genetic sequencing in their investigation of the ongoing food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce, a technique that is revolutionizing the detection of germs in food. The genetic analysis is being used to bolster investigations and — in some cases...
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FILE - This Jan. 24, 2012, file photo shows a plate of butternut Caesar salad with Romaine lettuce and roasted cubes of butternut squash. U.S. health officials say the E. coli outbreak linked to tainted romaine lettuce has grown and sickened 84 people from 19 states. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control said Wednesday, April 25, 2018, that at least another 31 cases are believed to be tied to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead, File)
April 25, 2018 - 8:13 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — The E. coli outbreak linked to tainted romaine lettuce has grown and sickened 84 people from 19 states, U.S. health officials said Wednesday. At least another 31 cases are believed to be tied to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said. Those...
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FILE--This Dec. 17, 1997, file photo, lettuce is harvested at a farm in Wellton, Ariz., east of Yuma. The Centers for Disease Control is expanding a warning about contaminated lettuce from Arizona that has now sickened dozens of people in several states. (AP Photo/Jeff Robbins, file)
April 21, 2018 - 5:45 am
PHOENIX (AP) — U.S. health officials on Friday told consumers to throw away any store-bought romaine lettuce they have in their kitchens and warned restaurants not to serve it amid an E. coli outbreak that has sickened more than 50 people in several states. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...
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FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2015 file photo, visitors walk toward Sleeping Beauty's Castle at Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif. Authorities say thieves made off with 8,000 Disneyland tickets when they stole a box trailer from a youth agricultural education organization. The California Highway Patrol says the trailer is owned by Future Farmers of America and was stolen Wednesday, April 18, 2018, from the group's office in the city of Galt, south of Sacramento. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
April 19, 2018 - 3:52 pm
GALT, Calif. (AP) — Thieves made off with 8,000 Disneyland tickets worth about $800,000 when they stole a box trailer from a youth agricultural education organization that was going to distribute them to participants at a conference in Southern California, officials said. The trailer owned by...
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Ben Miller looks at the sand bags around the house he owns as water runs over South Main Street in Harlem, Mont., Tuesday, April 17, 2018. The sand bags, all 235 of them, go around the house he rents to Jeff Werk who was also helping lay the bags. The water was overflowing from Thirtymile Creek which runs north of Harlem and connects to the Milk River a couple miles south. (Ryan Welch/Havre Daily News via AP)
April 18, 2018 - 6:33 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Runoff from a winter that approached or exceeded record snowfall across much of Montana is washing out roads, flooding fields and spilling rivers and streams over their banks much of the northern part of the state. The spring runoff and recent rain has caused the National...
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April 13, 2018 - 6:39 am
PITTSBURGH (AP) — What do you get when you combine mayonnaise and ketchup? A debate on Twitter after Heinz on Thursday launched a poll asking Americans if they'd like a pre-made combination of the condiments called Mayochup. Heinz will bring the product, which is currently available in parts of the...
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In this April 2, 2018, photo, greenhouse manager Oscar Ruiz prunes organic tomato plants growing in a greenhouse at Long Wind Farm in Thetford, Vt. Farm owner Dave Chapman is a leader of a farmer-driven effort to create an additional organic label that would exclude hydroponic farming and concentrated animal feeding operations. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
April 10, 2018 - 3:03 pm
THETFORD, Vt. (AP) — Was your tomato grown in dirt or water? Organic shoppers might notice additional labels this summer that will give them the answer — and tell them whether their choices align with what a rebellious group of farmers and scientists deem the true spirit of the organic movement...
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